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Valentine’s Day Worksheets and Activities

Valentine’s Day Worksheets and Activities

The following Valentine’s Day themed packet includes 12 fun and simple reproducibles. The following is included:

  1. Valentine’s Day Acrostic Poem
  2. Valentine’s Day Secret Message
  3. Valentine’s Day Word Play
  4. Valentine’s Day Word Search
  5. Valentine’s Day Word Unscramble
  6. Candy Heart Sort
  7. Owl Love You Forever
  8. Cupcake Contractions
  9. I Love Addition (sums to 10)
  10. I Love Subtraction (sums under 10)
  11. What Do You Love?
  12. Valentine’s Day Letter Writing Paper (3 designs!)

Recommended Grade Level(s): First, Second read more…

Ants On My Plate Activity

Ants On My Plate Activity

Lesson Overview:

This fun little ant craft is a great follow-up to your favorite story about ants or to this catchy tune that teaches counting. Once completed, students can use their finished products for pretend play.

Need help selecting a good read about ants? Be sure to check out our picks for ant books. We also recommend these additional ant activities.

Recommended Grade Level: Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten

Time Allotment: 30-45 minutes (with read aloud or sing aloud)

Materials:

paper plate (1 per child)

Picnic Food Template With Ants (1 per child)

scissors

glue sticks

crayons or colored pencils

Implementation:

With students gathered together, read aloud a story on ants or sing aloud the song “The Ants Go Marching #2” by Super Simple (video can be found here). With supplies available (would work well as a center), allow time for students to color, cut, and glue items from the Picnic Food Template on their paper plates. Students can then pretend they are having a picnic and then invaded by the ants!

Warm and Cool Colors

Warm and Cool Colors

Lesson Overview:

This is a lesson is an introduction to warm and cool colors. Students will learn, through examples, which colors are warm and cool and how those colors evoke certain feelings in the viewer.

Objective(s):

  1. Students will be able to differentiate between warm (yellow, red, and orange) and cool (blue, green, and purple) colors.
  2. Students will be able to discuss how the colors used in artwork can make the viewer feel a certain way.

Time Allotment: two 50-minute sessions

Materials:

pictures that feature warm colors and cool colors (a sunset, red balloons, a bowl of lemons, icy water, a field of green grass, purple fish)

drawing paper (1 per student)

colored pencils (per student)

Anticipatory Set:

With students gathered together, begin the lesson by stating the objectives. Begin showing students the pictures that feature the warm colors. Ask students to look at each picture and to consider how they feel when they look at each picture. Write the answers on the board or chart paper. Next, show the pictures that feature the cool colors. Again, ask students to consider how they feel and write the answers down.

Guided Practice:

Review the first set of pictures and the answers the students gave. At least some students should have recognized that those colors are energizing and generally make people feel happy, excited, or warm–that is why they are called warm colors. Next, review the second set of pictures and the answers given. Tell students that those colors generally make people feel relaxed, calm, or cool and that is why they are called cool colors. Tell students that artists can use warm and cool colors to give a piece of art a certain look–a look that will make the viewer feel a certain way when they look at it. Show a couple of examples to illustrate this. Use pictures from your favorite artist or The Starry Night and Sunflowers by Van Gogh are good examples. As you hold up each, ask the students to share what colors, warm or cool, the artist is using (sometimes warm and cool are both used, but one will usually dominate). Discuss how those colors communicate a certain mood. How do the pieces make the students feel?

Independent Practice:

Provide time for students to work independently on creating a picture of their own using the concept of warm and cool colors.

Closure:

Allow students time to share their artwork. Ask students to discuss what colors they chose and why. How do the artists’ feelings about the picture differ from the viewer’s?

Assessment:

Students will be assessed according to their ability to:

  1. Differentiate between warm (yellow, red, and orange) and cool (blue, green, and purple) colors.
  2. Discuss how the colors used in artwork can make the viewer feel a certain way.
GIANT Ear of Corn Craft (+Lesson)

GIANT Ear of Corn Craft (+Lesson)

Overview:

The following craft is a fun way to incorporate one of our largest food crops into your farm or fall theme. Students will use fine motor skills through painting, gluing and cutting. This craft also incorporates the use of real kernels, so children actually get to experience the corn seed! Use it alone or as one of the follow-up activities to the mini-lesson provided for a more in-depth learning experience.

Recommended Grade Level: Preschool-Third

Objective(s):

1. Students will verbally identify three parts of an ear of corn–the ear, the kernels, and the husk.

Suggested Read-Alouds:

Corn is Maize by Aliki

From Kernel to Corn by Robin Nelson

The Popcorn Book by Tomie dePaola

The Life and Times of Corn by Charles Micucci

Mini-Lesson:

Anticipatory Set:

Begin the lesson with the children gathered together. Show them an ear of corn wrapped in its husk. Ask the students if they know what it is called. Many should answer that it is “corn” or “corn on the cob”. Next, ask students if they like corn. Explain how a lot of corn is grown in America–some of which we eat, but much of it is fed to animals raised for their meat (e.g. cattle). Then, ask students to identify some of the ways that they eat corn at home (this can include foods that contain corn such as cornbread, tortillas, etc.). Finally, ask students to look at the ear of corn and ask if they know which parts are edible. Optional–choose one of the suggested read-alouds to expand the idea of what corn is, its parts, how it is grown, and its uses.

Guided Practice:

Tell students that you are going to dissect your ear of corn. As you do this, use the Corn Anatomy diagram to use as a labeled visual. Ask students to name the parts as you talk about them. Which part do we eat? Tell students that it is now their turn to dissect an ear of corn.

Independent Practice:

Allow students to mingle between three different centers. Each center will give the students practice with locating and naming the parts of an ear of corn.

Center 1–Giant Ear of Corn Craft

Center 2–Label Its Parts

Center 3–Sensory Spelling

Closure:

Bring students back together. Ask them which was their favorite activity. Hold up an ear of corn and ask students to label its parts.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed according to their ability to…

  1. Verbally identify three parts of an ear of corn–the ear, the kernels, and the husk.

Materials for “Sensory Spelling”:

3 long, shallow bins, 3 work trays or 3 tops from copier paper boxes

2-4 bags of dried corn kernels (unpopped popcorn)

2-3 bags of dried corn husks (in Hispanic Foods section of the grocery store)

6-12 small dried ears of corn with husks on (or opt for uncooked ears from your grocer)

letters (plastic, foam or die-cut)

one card per bin labeled with the following words–ear, kernels, husk

Procedure:

Bin #1–Fill with corn kernels and enough letters for 2-3 children to spell out the word “kernels”. Place a card with the word “kernels” outside of the bin for reference. Students will find letters to spell the word that identifies the material.

Bin #2–Fill with dried (or fresh) corn husks and enough letters for 2-3 children to spell out the word “husk”. Place a card with the word “husk” outside of the bin for reference. Students will find letters to spell the word that identifies the material.

Bin #3–Fill with ears of corn and enough letters for 2-3 children to spell out the word “ear”, Place a card with the word “ear” outside of the bin for reference. Students will find letters to spell the word that identifies the material.

Materials for “Label its Parts”:

1 copy of the Corn Anatomy Diagram

1 copy (per student) of the Label the Corn Parts Worksheet

Procedure:

Students will follow the directions provided on the Label the Parts worksheet.

Materials for Corn Craft:

Giant Ear of Corn Craft Printable

yellow paint

green paint

scissors

corn kernels

glue (Tacky or rubber cement work best)

Q-tips

Procedure:

  1. Have students paint giant ear of corn yellow and the husk green.
  2. Glue husk and ear together (if the paint is still wet, the two should stick together without glue).
  3. Using a Q-tip, students dab glue on the ear of corn and place kernels until the desired amount is added.
  4. Allow it to dry.
Elements of a Book Cover

Elements of a Book Cover

Overview:

A book’s cover is the first encounter a student has with a particular story. The title and the corresponding illustration is designed to make an impression so that the reader wants to read the story. Giving the elements that make up a book’s cover some special attention can teach students how important the title of a story is and how one really can judge a book by its cover. The following offers a lesson, follow-up activity and an extension activity.

Recommended Grade Level: First-Third

Time Allotment: 30-40 minutes

Materials:

1 Big book

2 short story books

Objective(s):

  1. Students will create a book cover that includes a related title and illustration for a short story read aloud.

Implementation:

The following worksheet is designed to be used with a book that the student has read or can read independently. Within the worksheet, students will be asked to think about the book’s title and illustration and how they relate to the story. Use as part of a literacy center, literature box, or guided reading group.

Anticipatory Set:

As part of a small or large group, display a big book for demonstration purposes. Have a few more short stories of regular size for pair-and-share later in the lesson. Ask students to look at the front cover of the book. Tell students that the front cover is a window into the book because the information we gather from the front of the book tells us what the book is about. Also, the people that create books spend a lot of time and money to make sure the book’s cover is really enticing so people will buy the book.

Guided Practice:

Draw students attention to the book title and then to the illustration on the book’s cover. Ask students how the two are related. Next, read the story. Ask students what the story was about. Does the title accurately tell what the story was about? Is the illustration appropriate? Is there a better title for the story? Finally, read a couple more short stories. For the first, cover the title and just show the picture on the front cover. Read the story and then have students think-pair-share what they think the title is. Uncover the title and allow them to see if they were correct. Discuss any differences. For the second title, cover the entire front cover. Read the story and then have students create their own cover for the story.

Independent Practice:

Provide a copy of My Book Cover for each student so they can write a title and draw a picture for the story.

Closure:

Gather students together to share their book covers. Finally, reveal the book’s cover. Discuss any differences. Prompt students to express how the elements of a book’s cover should give a good indication as to what the story is about.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed according to their ability to:

  1. Create a book cover that includes a related title and illustration for a short story read aloud.

Lesson Extension:

The following worksheet offers questions based on a book that the student has read or can read. This activity can be done as part of a literacy center, literature box, or guided reading group.

Tree Observation

Tree Observation

Overview:

Observation is a necessary skill for life and, therefore, an essential skill to teach young learners. In this activity, students will observe a tree, record their data, and make a prediction about future changes. This is a great way to introduce the scientific method and solidify concepts that take place during a particular season or all four! Use as a whole group activity or as a take-home investigation.

Recommended Grade Level: PreK-Third

Objectives(s): 

  1. Student(s) will observe and record data that represent the changes that occur over time in a tree.
  2. Students will make predictions about their tree.
  3. Student(s) will answer questions about their observations.

Implementation:

For the first observation, introduce the students to the tree they will be observing. Encourage them to use their senses and draw their attention to the various parts of the tree. 

Touch: Feel the bark. It is smooth or rough? Hug the tree (yes, really : ). How big around is the trunk? Touch the branches. Are there any low hanging ones?

Smell: Smell the tree. Does it smell of sap?

Hear: Listen to the tree. Can you hear the leaves/branches move in the wind?

For each subsequent observation, give the students a copy of the “My Tree Observation” worksheet to complete or have them put each observation as an entry in their science journals. After they observe and record their data, use the following questions to discuss their findings and to draw comparisons.

Questions:

  1. Is there anything different about my tree?
  2. Why has it changed?
  3. Are any of the changes measurable?
  4. What do I think it will look like next time I observe it?

Duration: You can choose how often you want the children to observe their tree. The weather in your area will obviously dictate this.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed according to their ability to:

  1. Observe a tree and record their data.
  2. Make 1-3 predictions about their tree.
  3. Answer 1-3 questions about what they have observed.

Apple Tree Through the Seasons

Apple Tree Through the Seasons

How do apples get on the apple tree? I can’t count how many preschoolers have asked me this over the years! This lesson teaches just that–the changes that occur in the apple tree through the four seasons. From bare branches in winter to crisp apples in the fall, preschoolers will learn how the apple tree gets its apples.

Objective(s):

  1. Students will complete a visual representation (Apple Tree Through the Seasons Worksheet) of the changes that occur in an apple tree through the four seasons.
  2. Explain (through verbal telling or acting out) the changes that occur in the apple tree through the four seasons.

Materials:

  • The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall (or any other book that demonstrates the changes of an apple tree)
  • copy of “Apple Tree Through the Seasons” worksheet
  • copy of “Apple Tree Through the Seasons Explained” worksheet
  • green paint (2 different shades-one light, one darker)
  • pink paint
  • red paint
  • pencils with new erasers (one per color of paint)
  • *crayons or markers could be used in place of paint (but the round circles the erasers make look like apples)

Direct Instruction:

Gather students in a group. Read The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall. As you read, ask questions to draw students’ attention to the differences in the apple tree through the seasons.

As a group, review the changes that take place in the apple tree by acting it out (winter–stand still with arms out and eyes closed to represent tree sleeping/dormant, spring–jump with eyes open wide and hands pop open to represent the tree springing to life, summer–stand with arms out and and hands making fists to represent small apples budding, fall–stand with arms out and hands making an “O” to represent large apples on the tree.

Guided Practice:

As a group or part of a science center, provide a copy of the “Apple Tree Through the Seasons” worksheet for each student. Review the changes that occur during each season. Then, allow students to work together, sharing paint supplies, to complete the worksheet. As students work, discuss why it is important to know these changes–how can they be compared to other living things?

*Students will dip the eraser into the paint and then onto the tree.

The tree should be painted as follows: winter–none, spring–green for leaves and pink for flowers, summer–green for leaves and lighter green for budding apples, fall–green for leaves and red for ripe apples

Independent Practice:

Have students complete the “Apple Tree Through the Seasons Explained” worksheet.

Closure:

As a group, have students share their worksheets and tell about the changes in the apple tree over the seasons. Can students think of other fruits that grow on trees?

Assessment:

Students will be assessed according to their ability to:

  1. Complete a visual representation (Apple Tree Through the Seasons Worksheet) of the changes that occur in an apple tree through the four seasons.
  2. Explain (through written or verbal telling or acting out) the changes that occur in the apple tree through the four seasons.

Possible Modifications/Adaptations:

For students who have difficulty remembering the sequence:

Fold paper into fourths. Have student focus on one season at a time.

Draw/color additional items in the square to represent that season and to prompt student to think about what changes take place in that particular season.

For students who have difficulty Allow student(s) to verbally tell or even act out the changes that occur.

Five Little Speckled Frogs Activities

Five Little Speckled Frogs Activities

“Five Little Speckled Frogs, sat on a great big log”…such a catchy little tune and a fun way to incorporate frogs and backwards counting into your curriculum. But the fun doesn’t stop with the song! Below you will find several follow-up activities for the Five Little Speckled Frogs Song. The activities range in skill level–from simple coloring pages, to cutting out finger puppets, to counting up to 20. A short description is provided for each, so you can find the one(s) that best suit your student’s needs.  read more…

Fall Word Study

Fall Word Study

The following activities and worksheets provide opportunities for students to engage in word study using nouns, verbs and adjectives that are related to the fall season. read more…

Winter Compound Word Sort

Winter Compound Word Sort

The following activity uses compound words that relate to wintertime. Simply print the winter compound word list on heavy paper, cut out each mitten and laminate. Students can then manipulate the cards to form winter compound words or take turns using them as part of a matching game. A recording sheet is also included for students to write down the wintertime compound words that they create. read more…

We’re Going on a Leaf Hunt Follow-up Activities

We’re Going on a Leaf Hunt Follow-up Activities

Lesson Overview:

A great way to introduce children to the wonders of the fall season…We’re Going on a Leaf Hunt by Steve Metzger is a story about three friends who go on a hiking adventure in search of leaves.

Recommended Grade Level(s): Pre-K, Kindergarten, First, Second

Time Allotment: Dependent on the number of activities implemented

Implementation:

Read the story aloud and then set out on your own outdoor adventure! Provide children with small paper bags or buckets with handles so they can collect their own leaf samples. Samples can then be used to complete the following activities:

read more…

Fall Color Wheel

Fall Color Wheel

This activity is great for use as a learning center. It was designed to accompany the book We’re Going on a Leaf Hunt by Steve Metzger, so leaves first need to be collected. If you are short on time, provide a small paper bag for students to collect their leaves during recess. Once leaves are gathered, students will sort their leaves by color using the Fall Color Wheel. A Fall Color Wheel Graph and follow-up questions are provided for students to interpret their results. read more…

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