Lesson Overview:

In this lesson, students will identify two ways people can communicate when they have lost their sense of hearing. Concepts will be solidified as students practice using the finger alphabet derived from American Sign Language.

Objective(s): 

Students will…

  1. Follow directions and participate in the discussion/lesson activities.
  2. Verbalize two ways people communicate when they have lost their sense of hearing.
  3. Point to the organ people use to communicate with when they have lost their sense of hearing.

Time Allotment: 

40-50 minutes

Materials: 

copy of the “Finger Alphabet” worksheet (1 per student)

examples of signs (http://www.aslpro.com/)

Anticipatory Set: 

Begin the lesson by stating the objective. Ask students if they know someone or have met someone who is deaf. Tell students that when someone is deaf they have lost their sense of hearing. This could be for many different reasons–some people are born that way, some people had ear infections or fevers as a baby that led to their loss, or they have been in an accident that caused their loss. Tell students that even though they can not hear with their ears, they can use another sense to communicate with other people. Ask students which sense they think can be used. Tell students that people who are deaf can use their sense of sight to read other people’s lips and to read sign language. Provide a few signs as examples. Ask students if they know some signs or have ever seen people signing. Tell students that because reading lips is not easy and it takes a lot of practice, not all people who are deaf can read lips. Most will learn and use sign language instead. Demonstrate lip reading by mouthing something to the class. Have students try to guess what is being said. Have students then turn to a partner to practice lip reading. Prompt students by having them say and animal or color and then a complete sentence. Ask students how difficult they found the exercise. Discuss how lip reading takes patience, a lot of focus, and close proximity to the person so the lips are seen. Tell students that is why sign language is commonly used. Once a person learns sign language, it becomes as quick and natural as speaking. It can also be seen from across the room.

Guided Practice: 

Pass out a copy of the “Finger Alphabet”. Model for students how to form the letters of the alphabet. Tell students that the alphabet can be used to spell names or words. Many people learning sign language will spell things out, but it can take a long time. The signs for all the different words are usually learned and used during conversation. Have students attempt to sign there own names by using their worksheet.

Independent Practice: 

Monitor students as they attempt to sign three of their classmates names using the their alphabet worksheet and name tags.

Closure: 

Gather students to discuss the “Big ideas” from the lesson. Ask students to recall how people communicate when they have lost their sense of hearing. Ask students what the condition is called when a person has loss their sense of hearing. Ask students to point to the organ that people use to communicate with when they have lost their sense of hearing.

Assessment: 

Students will be assessed according to their ability to…

  1. Participate in the discussion/lesson activities.
  2. Verbalize two ways people communicate when they have lost their sense of hearing.
  3. Point to the sense people use to communicate with when they have lost their sense of hearing.