Author: LPS Admin

The Grouchy Lady Bug | by Eric Carle

I recently found a few fun art projects and lessons that connect to Eric Carle’s story The Grouchy Lady Bug. The story is geared towards a young crowd and lends itself to a variety of art, literary, math and science connections. Here are a few follow-up’s to the story: Styrofoam lady bug art project Time and math lessons using the time mentioned in the story Lady bug puppet Grouchy Lady Bug Art Project and Tic-Tac-Toe And for those of you that can’t get enough, there are more games and puzzles from the Grouchy Lady Bug story. [asa]0064434508[/asa] [asa]B000WYKB8K[/asa] [asa]B000UELJT2[/asa]...

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Mineral Identification

Goal(s): This lesson will teach students how to test and identify minerals according to their physical properties. Grade level(s): 4-5 Objective(s): Students will be able to identify a mineral according to its physical characteristics. Students will be able to test a mineral for specific characteristics (color, luster, streak, texture, breakage). Students will be able to explain how the physical characteristics of a mineral can be tested. Focusing Question(s): Is your sample a mineral? Did it pass every test? Time Allotment: 1 class period Material(s): 4 minerals per pair of students magnifying glass (1 per student) 1 Minerals Test Worksheet (per student) several copies of A Field Guide to Rocks and Minerals by Frederick H. Pough Vocabulary: characteristics, texture, luster, streak, cleavage, sample Anticipatory Set: Students will be told the objective. Students will be seated with their science buddy. Each pair of students will be given a rock and a mineral and asked if they have anything in common. Some students may be able to identify that one is a mineral. Students will then be asked to recall that most rocks contain two or more minerals, but to identify a mineral, one needs to look for many things. Students will be asked all the ways that they know of to identify, sort, or organize rocks. Answers will be listed on a piece of large chart paper. Direct Instruction/Guided Practice: Students will be...

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Sedimentary Rocks Lesson Plan

Goal(s): Students will develop an understanding of how sedimentary rocks are formed. Grade level(s): 4-5 Objective(s): Students will be able to identify a sedimentary rock by its visual markings (lines/layers). Students will be able to explain how sedimentary rocks are formed (through erosion and the compressing/cementing of smaller rocks and plant/animal material). Time Allotment: 1 class period Focusing Question(s): What root word in “sedimentary” tells you how sedimentary rocks are formed? What visual characteristic helps us identify sedimentary rocks? Why do sedimentary rocks have layers? Material(s): (all materials are needed for each pair of students) plaster cement pint-sized milk cartons (three per pair) sand decomposed leaves water mixing spoon teaspoon tablespoon Vocabulary: sediment, sedimentary rock, cement, compressed/compression, sandstone, coal, and limestone Anticipatory Set: Students will be told the objective. The students will be given a sedimentary rock and asked to observe the rock and record their findings in their science journal. The students will be asked to recall the previous lesson on weathering. Students will be asked why they think their rock appears to have different layers. Answers will be written on the board. Direct Instruction/Guided Practice: The focusing questions will guide the class in a discussion about sedimentary rocks. Vocabulary paired with pictures will be introduced. Answers to the questions will be solidified through the viewing of an interactive video on how sedimentary rocks are formed (http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/23899-the-geology-of-earth-igneous-rocks-video.htm). Students will then be...

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Weathering on Rocks

Goal(s): Students will complete a variety of activities that demonstrate how weathering and erosion change the Earth’s surface. Grade level(s): 4-5 Objective(s): Students will be able to identify and explain (in at least one way) how weathering and erosion changes the Earth’s surface. Material(s): 15 rough, sandstone, limestone, or shale rocks (1 set X four groups) Three 32 ounce plastic containers (1 set X four groups) Three jars (1 set X four groups) pen, paper, and masking tape, to label both the containers and the clear jars with A, B, C small plastic trays (1 for each group) magnifying glasses (2 for each group) water (16 ounces per group) Time Allotment: 1 class period, 15 minutes of prep time the day before Vocabulary: weathering, erosion, sediment, environmental elements Focusing Question(s): What happened when the rocks were exposed to water? What happened when the rocks were exposed to the water and the rigorous shaking? Day before the lesson: 1) Each group of rocks will be equally separated into three piles. Rocks will be placed onto a sheet of paper labeled “A”, “B”, and “C”. 2) Each container and jar will be labeled “A”, “B”, and “C”. 3) Stones from pile “A” will be placed into container “A ” and filled half way with water. The same will be done to piles “B” and “C”. 4) Students will record their observations...

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Moh’s Scale of Hardness Lesson Plan

Goal(s): This lesson will teach students how to use the Moh’s Scale of Mineral Hardness to determine the hardness of various minerals. Grade level(s): 4-5 Objective(s): Students will be able to use the Moh’s Scale of Mineral Hardness to determine the hardness of various minerals. Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of what a mineral is. Standard(s): Earth, Space, and Science (3-5) 2. Identify the physical properties of minerals (hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak), and explain how minerals can be tested for these different physical properties. Time Allotment: 1 class period Focusing Question(s): What do the numbers mean on the scale? Material(s): (1 per pair of students) minerals from previous lesson wet rag penny dull butter knife steel file small piece of porcelain (with edges taped for protection) Vocabulary: Mineralogist, Mohs Scale of Hardness Procedure: 1) Students will be seated with their science buddy and told the objective. Students will be asked to recall the previous lesson on how to identify a mineral. Students will be asked to state some of the characteristics we look for when we are trying to identify a mineral. Students will be asked to recall that there is a sixth way to identify a mineral. Students will be given a brief history with visuals on the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs and the Moh’s Scale of Mineral Hardness. 2) Students will be provided with the same group of...

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